Double-Entry Journal on The Kite Runner
PEN

As we read our novel, you will be asked to examine major themes and concepts, to analyze different characters, and to create your own meaning of the work. A double-entry journal will aid you in this process.

Requirements:
  • Read Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner. This is a long novel and so we will spend a significant amount of time reading (both in and out of class).
  • Complete a Double-Entry Journal for our entire novel.
  • Journal submissions should be written in the provided notebooks.
  • EACH chapter should have it's own submission. Include chapter headings in the journal!
  • Format your journal by using the template below. (I suggest copy & pasting this template into your English folder.)
  • Write down quotes, character descriptions, or plot points on the left hand side and then write down your personal response, reactions, or connections to these on the right.
  • After each quarter of the novel, I will collect your journals. They will be assessed by the rubric at the bottom of this page.

Below are several, but not all, ways to use a DOUBLE-ENTRY JOURNAL. You should aim to respond in a variety of ways using most of the options below.

Quote or plot summary
Response, reactions, and connections
Quote, character or setting description, or plot summary
1. Visual commentary (drawings)
Quote, character or setting description, or plot summary
2. Give personal reactions. For example:
“This bugs me because….”
“This upsets me because….”
“This makes me happy because…”
Quote, character or setting description, or plot summary
3. Ask questions and try to answer. For example:
“I wonder why did _?”
“Is the only ?”
Quote, character or setting description, or plot summary
4. Predict what will happen. For example:
“I wonder if does _ later”
“I bet_is the character’s mother/father/etc”
Quote, character or setting description, or plot summary
5. Make connections to other text (books, movies, songs). For example:
“This reminds of the songbecause_”
“The main character is like_in because

Quote, character or setting description, or plot summary
6.Make connections to yourself. For example:
“I can relate to what the character did because_”
“I would never do because_”
Quote, character or setting description, or plot summary
7. Make connections to what is or has happened in the world. For example:
“This situation is similar to
“This reminds me of the news report last night on_”
Quote, character or setting description, or plot summary
8.Explore the importance of a specific plot or character in relation to the larger story. For example:
“This will prevent the character from getting into college as he wants to do.”
Quote, character or setting description, or plot summary
9. Consider social questions/issues (race, class, gender issues). For example:
“It is obvious that society still does not help out the poor enough.”
“Why are the female students not encouraged to do better in math?”

Click on the link below to see the rubric used for your journal submissions: